But on a larger scale, the agreement brought together 44 nations from around the world, who brought them together to solve a growing global financial crisis. It has helped strengthen the global economy as a whole and maximize international trade benefits. The agreement also facilitated the creation of very important financial structures: the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), now known as the World Bank. The Bretton Woods countries have decided not to give the IMF the power of a global central bank. Instead, they agreed to contribute to a solid pool of national currencies and gold, which would be held by the IMF. Each member country of the Bretton Woods system then had the right to borrow as part of its dues, which it needed. The IMF was also responsible for implementing the Bretton Woods agreement. In the final act, the most important part of the conference and the subsequent functioning of the world economy was the IMF agreement. Its main features were: there was a high degree of convergence between powerful nations that the inability to coordinate exchange rates during the interwar period had exacerbated political tensions. This facilitated the decisions of the Bretton Woods conference. In addition, all the Bretton Woods governments agreed that the monetary chaos of the interwar period had brought some valuable lessons. The Bretton Woods Agreement is one of those turning points in the development of modern financial systems, which established the dollar as the standard currency for world trade after World War II.

While the Bretton Woods system was demanting during the Nixon administration, the financial institutions created by the Agreement – the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank – remain part of the finances of the 21st century. Post-war global capitalism suffered from a huge shortage of dollars. The U.S. had huge trade surpluses and U.S. reserves were huge and growing. It was necessary to reverse this river.